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Showing posts from September, 2017

VETTING IN

People often ask why there is Vetting in for cats before allowing cats to enter shows.

There are many reason but generally it is to prevent spread of disease and also to ensure the cats/kittens brought to show are in good enough health and condition to be shown. Vets at vetting in may check for:

EAR MITES - these are easily spread from one cat to another, and if not treated can cause complications resulting in more severe infections of the ear. Lets face it, they must be very uncomfortable for the cat/kitten involved, and we don't want them to spread to our cats/kittens if we can prevent it.

FLEAS - Fleas easily spread from one cat to another and must be really uncomfortable for the animal. Fleas can spread without any contact with the other cat/kittens.

Fleas can also spread problems such as MYCOPLASMA which are small bacteria that can cause respiratory problems (sneezing, coughing etc) and genital, urinary problems. It is anaerobic (survives without oxygen) and is contagious.

Vi…

PREGNANCY

In humans we are very careful what is administered to pregnant females, particularly during the first 3 or 4 months of pregnancy - why should it be any different in pregnant cats. Please take care what you give your pregnant cats, particularly during those first 3 or 4 weeks of pregnancy. Personally i never flea control or worm control my pregnant girls during those first precious weeks of pregnancy - this should be done before you put your queen to stud.

Whenever one of our queens leave their kittens they are given a flea and worm control. Our queens are also given a flea and worm control before visiting a stud.

If you are concerned about worms then take a faecal sample to ensure there are no internal parasites present.

There are many other tests that can be carried out before putting your queen to stud many of which depend on which breed of cat being bred such as:
Blood test for Blood group.
HCM - heart screening.
Blood test for deficiencies such as B12, Folic acid.
Cheek swabs for …

Wild Look in Bengals and Savannahs.

Early Generation Bengal with a "wild" look -  spotted legs and tail -  Open nocturnal eyes  - Look at how high the white comes up on the face, a sign that the "whited" tummy will stay longer than the first year or two, ensuring that "wild" look.
The "whited tummy" is often talked about in the Bengal and Savannah breeding world, but there is the domestic white, and the wild white which are two entirely different things.
The domestic white is a dead white which doesn't change.  However, the wild whited tummy is not so white in the daylight, but at night or when a light catches it the reflection of white is stunning.  The white tummy in the early gens can often appear to have a mauve or greyish tinge to it until that light catches it, especially when it is in darker light.